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  • Results from Game Design Challenge: Leap Motion

    [12.24.13]
    - Danny Cowan
  • Motion-controlled gaming has made numerous strides over the last few years, and the Leap Motion peripheral opens up new possibilities within the space. By waving their hands over a small desktop sensor, players can engage with PC games in new and unique ways, enhancing immersion and adding an element of novelty to supported games.

    Released earlier this year, the Leap Motion is able to track a player's hands and all 10 fingers with very low latency. Leap Motion-specific games like Blue Estate and Double Fine's Dropchord give an early glimpse at the device's potential, and suggest new possibilities for 3D gesture control.

    For its latest Game Design Challenge, Game Career Guide challenged its readers to design a game for the Leap Motion accessory. Here are our top picks.

    Best Entries

    Edlen R. Pernandez, Student of Multimedia University Faculty of Computing and Informatics (see page 2)

    João Gabriel Guedes Pinheiro, Student of Game Design in Univali, Brazil (see page 3)

    Mehdi Saemi, Student of Multimedia University Faculty of Computing and Informatics, Tickle to Kill (see page 4)

    David Howey and Ian Vega, Leap Motion: Origami (see page 5)

    Wan Fuad Aizat, Student of Multimedia University Faculty of Computing and Informatics, Like a Surgeon  (see page 6)

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