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-   -   Testing: a foot in the door? (http://www.gamecareerguide.com/forums/showthread.php?t=20)

HagNasty 04-23-2007 08:06 PM

Testing: a foot in the door?
 
I have heard that testing can be a foot in the door for a game company. Go into testing and display programming skills and maybe get a programming job there of scripting job ect.

I have also heard that It's not going to lead anywhere other then testing. Maybe lead testing or something more on the marketing side but, thats about it.

Can anyone confirm this? Deny it? Maybe it's true for smaller a company but not larger one. Lets discuss it.

MattP 04-24-2007 02:07 PM

I landed a testing job at a small out-sourced company. It is because I am in college that I haven't considered staying after graduating. The chances of me moving up to lead tester are fairly high. However, this company doesn't have much else since they are out-sourced. After lead tester I can only see myself going into management positions.

Do I think it's hard or easy to move up from the bottom rung? Well, whether you stay in testing or move up is just like any other job. The work you put into your job as well as your networking (people) skills is what can help you move up. Try to make sure you show up to work, do your job the best you can, ask questions if you are unsure of something, and get to know your upper management as well as your co-workers. Try to show your boss(es) that you can calmly go that extra mile and follow through with it.

Seems simple, but you'd be surprised how often I see people who don't do even the minimum.

What you put into it is what you get out of it. Oh, and again, networking is probably the biggest benefit you can have.

MitchyD 04-29-2007 06:19 PM

I've read up on what Testing is, how it works and where it goes. It's summed up in what Matt just said - my curiousity springs from "Where do I go" and "How do I get there"

What did you do to get your testing job? Did you go to school before, or after? How did you come across said company and land the job, in general?

Thanks for the help! :)

simonc 04-30-2007 05:46 AM

Actually, we've just commissioned an article on this very subject for an upcoming GameCareerGuide.com front page feature - should be available in the next few weeks. So hopefully that should help provide some context!

Thanks,
Simon.
[Editorial Director, CMP Game Group.]

MattP 04-30-2007 08:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MitchyD (Post 95)
I've read up on what Testing is, how it works and where it goes. It's summed up in what Matt just said - my curiousity springs from "Where do I go" and "How do I get there"

What did you do to get your testing job? Did you go to school before, or after? How did you come across said company and land the job, in general?

Thanks for the help! :)

Me? I went to E3.

I played a few matches of Virtua Fighter 5 with this person. He was the only one that provided me a challenge, so we decided to chat it up a bit. I asked where he worked and he told me he was a lead game tester. I asked him to get me a job. He laughed and said that he was too far away (E3 is in L.A.) and that the job is in Maryland. I told him that I lived in Maryland. He was shocked and we exchanged e-mails. After E3 was over I just kept in touch and talked to him about games and other things as he would let me know when an opening came up. Eventually it did, and I landed the job.

There you go, networking :cool:.

Dale 05-02-2007 04:23 AM

Testing is a great way to get a foot in the door!

I know a lot of people who think of it as "All I gotta do is test the game". I took a different approach and thought "What can I make of this and how can I stand out?" And so, if I found a bug, I would look through the scripts and suggest changes (as a tester NEVER demand a fix! Coders hate that). If I thought of a different/better way something could happen, I would suggest it to the design team. And in the little free time I had, I wrote a scenario with the help of one of the game's designers. As it happened, they loved the scenario so much it ended up being released with the game.

And ignore the size of the company. It happened at Firaxis, one of the biggest names in strategy.

Now I'm negotiating a contract to work on a new game, where I'll be the coder/designer. :)

Dale

homer20 05-03-2007 11:46 AM

Does anybody know if there is a preferred or recommended educational background for QA testing??

MattP 05-03-2007 05:13 PM

Someone had been hired who didn't even know how to minimize a window. . .

Guess that shows you how low the bar is set for game testing. As long as you can spot bugs, report them, and write/speak proper english, you should be fine.

HagNasty 05-03-2007 08:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MattP (Post 135)
As long as you can spot bugs, report them, and write/speak proper English, you should be fine.

Given that your are in a English company. Ubisoft Montreal, the working language is French. More languages just mean more possibilities :P

MattP 05-04-2007 06:59 AM

I was considering that when I wrote that post. That people weren't in English speaking countries. But basically the same rule applies, know the language and be able to effectively communicate with your co-workers and bosses.


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