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-   -   I'm a tad bit worried now. (http://www.gamecareerguide.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3334)

Siberianhusky89 01-31-2010 03:02 PM

I'm a tad bit worried now.
 
Alright, I know I've done this a billion times, trying to get advice on what my major should be, last time I said Bioengineering and asking if it'd work and got great responses, and I'm still considering it however... *Sigh* It's hard to explain. But to make it short and get more to the point, people have continuously suggested I go into making video game soundtracks and working my way up, but I'm too nervous about this idea. The reason they suggest this (As you may already know or not) is because I'm good at music and they know I enjoy video games as well as video game music. My problem is this though...

1. I enjoy music, however, I'm unsure whether to make it a career.

2. If I was to be a music director for video games, would it conflict with me being able to actually design games? I want to help with with the actual making of the game, but I don't want to make games like Guitar Hero, DDR, or rythme based games. Not that I don't think they're good, I like playing Rock Band and such, but I don't think I'd actually want to help make them myself.

3. I notice that a lot of companies expect you to sell out. What I mean is, and don't really quote me on this, they expect you to try to make stuff that isn't really interesting and just fits with the background or that appeals to the majority (or attempts to appeal to the majority).

4. I'm not sure about whether I want to make music a career. I love it very much so, however at the same time, I... *Sigh* I don't know... I'm a bit confused...

Adrir 01-31-2010 04:02 PM

Just because you have a degree in something, that doesn't mean that you must have a job doing that thing. Simply, study something you are passionate about.

tsloper 01-31-2010 04:04 PM

1. You need to make a decision. Here's one way to sift through all the confusing data: http://www.sloperama.com/advice/m70.htm. If you've tried it and it didn't help, try it again.
2. No.
3. Read http://www.igda.org/games-game-september-2009
4. You can get un-confused if you just break all the info down into bite-size chunks and examine them one by one, then gather the data into a decision grid. If that doesn't help, please explain why.

Siberianhusky89 01-31-2010 05:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Adrir (Post 18232)
Just because you have a degree in something, that doesn't mean that you must have a job doing that thing. Simply, study something you are passionate about.

Yeah... I know... I mean, it just seems like if I was to go into an industry with that degree, they'd expect me to help with the music more than anything else, or help making the next Guitar Hero and such based off my credentials.

@TSloper

This reminded me of Hedonistic Calculus actually... It's not that I'm attempting to decide what would be best for game design, I'm just having such a hard time deciding what I'm most interested in so that I can major in it, plus, I'm a little concerned whether it'd conflict or.. well, you already answered that in 2. So basically, if I DO work on the music for a game, I could possibly and eventually help work on the other features for the game besides music?

Example: Let's say they're making a new fighting game and I want to help with some of the character designs. How would I go from music into helping with that?

For 3, I read what it said. The biggest problem is this, for crossing the line, it really depends. They might ask me to make something I don't want to, though, I'd doubt it somewhat... However, you can never be too sure. Street Fighter 4 attempted to make a club type techno song (A very, very popular genre in America). Did it fail? Yes, but they most likely did it to appeal to the majority and not for the passion of music. *Sigh* Anyhow, I don't want some producer to come up to me and go like "Alright, I want you to make a song like Miley Cyrus's" or "Lady Gaga is a hit, try to copy off of her." I'm not down for that...

For 4, I looked at 1. I'll try that method.

bob 01-31-2010 07:19 PM

Husky,

There's nothing inherently wrong with doing something just for the sake of the majority. Say you're throwing a party with all your friends over and even a lot of people you don't know and you want them all to have a good time. You're next to the stereo trying to decide which music to play. Is it selling-out to put on music that the majority will like? No, you're just trying to make people happy.

You need to define what selling out really means to you, otherwise you may continue to have an unclear idea about it and hold yourself back. I think your definition of "selling out" is doing something for money that violates your principles. Figure out what your principles are, what you want to accomplish with your music, and then just stick to them. For instance, say we're back at the party. If you're someone who likes to promote the equal rights of women, then playing gangsta rap because that's what everyone likes would probably be "selling out." But that's different from just playing what the majority likes, and this is what you need to figure out for yourself.

If I had to make some WW2 shooter game that was originally designed just to appeal to the masses, I would give it all the mass-market appeal required by my employer while at the same time inserting my personality and influence to make sure it coincided with my principles. For example, one of your squad-mates would always wonder why the Germans were doing this, and he would refuse to swallow the propagandized answers the others gave him. It would be a minor element, but it would remind the player that the Germans must have reasons for what they're doing - that "because they're nazis" isn't a thorough investigation, and is actually dehumanizing.

The only time I would really refuse to do something was if I was not allowed to explore my own themes like that on a significant level. Then the game would be a waste of time for me, and I can't bear the idea of wasting an entire development cycle's worth of my career and my short life on this planet.

Lastly, the music you become known for is probably the music you'll be hired for. A company isn't gonna hear you make a sweet techno song and then hire you to make country. If all the music you promote yourself with is what you like to make, then the music you'll be hired to make will be too. (At least, that's what it seems like to me. Someone correct me if that's not how it works)

tsloper 01-31-2010 07:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Siberianhusky89 (Post 18238)
you already answered that in 2. So basically, if I DO work on the music for a game, I could possibly and eventually help work on the other features for the game besides music?

So if I say it one time, you don't believe it. But if I say it a second time, you'll believe it?
I actually don't care whether you believe it or not. So I'm not going to bother answering it a second time.

Siberianhusky89 01-31-2010 07:51 PM

@bob

Well, it's not that I'm appealing to the majority, it's the fact that I HATE the type of music that's popular (Not all). And making music that I put passion into or really worked on is something I enjoy, not some half assed, nonsensical song that's just trying to sell and has no emotion behind the instruments, lyrics, etc... But I get what you mean...


@Tom

Well, not quite what I mean "-_- Like... For example, when you mentioned it before, you said I could probably make a game based on Bioengineering and such. But does that mean if I get a music degree, I'll have to work on a music based game? Cause I don't really want to work on the next Rock Band and such. Most of the bands on there (in my opinion) are suckyish. Get what I mean? It's not that you said it a second time, I'm more or less asking "Alright, I understand that I can get a degree in anything I like and that would be a good idea and I understand I could probably work on games. But because I have this degree, does that mean I'll have to work on only THESE type of games even though I wouldn't want to?" That's what I meant. It's not that I don't believe you, it's just I don't understand it too clearly, though I'm a bit slow to be honest.

tsloper 01-31-2010 08:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Siberianhusky89 (Post 18242)
if I get a music degree, I'll have to work on a music based game?

The other guy talked about this. You, young Jedi, are not a good listener. It's too much work trying to teach you things. You need to open your mind more, and stop trying to envision the world as "knowable" and "black and white." It's a colorful nuanced world, and she's inscrutable.

EvilLlama 01-31-2010 08:29 PM

In college, you still have "free" time. Free is in quotes because it often gained by master time management skills and prioritizing (ie cutting back on sleeping/showering :D ). If you don't want to work on music games, try to use your free time to design/create games that are related to the types you want to work on instead. That way, you have something to show to companies other than just your major, and thus have a higher chance of getting hired for a position/project not directly tied to your major.

bob 01-31-2010 08:37 PM

And also, I don't know if you paid attention to my last paragraph, but:

Lastly, the music you become known for is probably the music you'll be hired for. A company isn't gonna hear you make a sweet techno song and then hire you to make country. If all the music you promote yourself with is what you like to make, then the music you'll be hired to make will be too. (At least, that's what it seems like to me. Someone correct me if that's not how it works)


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