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-   -   Need some feedback on my portfolio (http://www.gamecareerguide.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4907)

Teko 05-23-2011 10:58 AM

Need some feedback on my portfolio
 
Hello, this is my first post! I hope you guys can give me some pointers on my portfolio.

http://yatsuzuka.wordpress.com/

I really want a job as a 3D modeler (preferably character), I don't really care if it's for games or film/commercials (I'll take what I can get), so there's my dilemma. I've tried to include both low poly and high poly works as well as a few environment works to appeal to companies but I don't know if I'm going about it the right way.

My resume is also listed on the website for you guys to read (I usually send in the resume as a word doc, but this is just for convenience purposes)

Last of all, I would like a truly honest opinion about where I stand in my artwork. Is it good? bad? adequate? I have no work experience, just personal and school projects, (not even an animation school: UC Irvine) and internships are hard to come by for some reason; so it's hard for me to land a job when most places ask for 3 years experience.

I know this is a lot to ask for, but I hope you guys can critique the hell out of my portfolio. Thanks in advanced!

Teko 05-23-2011 11:08 PM

Cool thanks! I guess the problem I'm having is finding some entry level jobs. I check craigslist, indeed.com, and local companies (la and orange county area), but come up short. Do you have any resources or tips on where to look.

Also I'm not sure about resume, do you think its up to par with content and layout?

Thanks again!

Teko 05-26-2011 03:59 PM

Thanks for the links. Pretty much I'm thinking that getting an internship would be the best route in getting my foot in the door. But looking around, I don't see companies openly hiring for interns or junior positions. How willing are companies (such as VFX studios in LA (big and small), maybe even game companies) to take in "volunteers"? Like if I were to email them and tell them I would work for free for experience, basically work as an intern, would they even consider my offer? Is this a good route to take?

johnbriner 05-31-2011 05:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Teko (Post 24754)
Hello, this is my first post! I hope you guys can give me some pointers on my portfolio.

http://yatsuzuka.wordpress.com/

I really want a job as a 3D modeler (preferably character), I don't really care if it's for games or film/commercials (I'll take what I can get), so there's my dilemma. I've tried to include both low poly and high poly works as well as a few environment works to appeal to companies but I don't know if I'm going about it the right way.

My resume is also listed on the website for you guys to read (I usually send in the resume as a word doc, but this is just for convenience purposes)

Last of all, I would like a truly honest opinion about where I stand in my artwork. Is it good? bad? adequate? I have no work experience, just personal and school projects, (not even an animation school: UC Irvine) and internships are hard to come by for some reason; so it's hard for me to land a job when most places ask for 3 years experience.

I know this is a lot to ask for, but I hope you guys can critique the hell out of my portfolio. Thanks in advanced!


WOW! You're good! I like it, I really like the Brad Pitt model, It's cool, and also the mutant! I like all of your works! Thanks for sharing!

nightblue 06-01-2011 08:06 AM

Teko: I think your foundations are good. What you are not showing off in your portfolio are personality of your characters, and creativity overall. While it is possible to find a job as a modeling grunt who just go by photo refs or model sheets, your chances will get much higher if you can showcase your creativity as an artist. Your portfolio will also stand out a lot more if people can look at your characters and make a mental connection to them - something that makes them stand out, gives them stories, not just "another muscle guy" or "another horror monster".

Imagine an art director trying to mention your particular portfolio to a colleague after seeing about 20 of them together. Will he be able to just say "the old dude with the badass mechanical arm" to immediately cause the other person to say "yeah that one"? Or will they both struggle to figure out exactly which portfolio they are talking about without having to pull it back up on the screen? Leaving a deep impression will make a huge difference.

Teko 06-02-2011 12:40 AM

Oh thats weird, the other guy's posts disappeared. Anyways, thanks for the advice nightblue. I'll definitely take that into consideration for my future projects. Right now I'm trying to work on a mod team, like those that use existing engines to make a new game. Would gaming companies see that as a valuable source of experience?

yaustar 06-02-2011 04:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Teko (Post 24828)
Oh thats weird, the other guy's posts disappeared. Anyways, thanks for the advice nightblue. I'll definitely take that into consideration for my future projects. Right now I'm trying to work on a mod team, like those that use existing engines to make a new game. Would gaming companies see that as a valuable source of experience?

My bad. I was doing a mass spambot clean and as far as I can tell, he was spammer.

nightblue 06-06-2011 09:55 AM

While your first sell is always going to be your portfolio, I'd say experience in working in teams is very valuable as well, especially if you do score an interview. Instead of purely talking about personal art, you will be able to draw from your team experience and show what kind of member you'll be in your future team. Getting through the initial frictions that come with having to work with others you may or may not know well will also help you meld into your professional role faster and smoother.

In general, you score your interview with portfolio, resume, and art test, and from there on it's all about your personality and experience.

Deo85 09-26-2011 04:55 AM

Here is the GOOD:
1) You are a talented artist and show a deep understanding in form and anatomy as well as design and space awareness

2) you have a clerk sit in design . It gives me the needed detail of your background, showcases your tallest, and demonstrates yet again you know your stuff when it comes to design and layout.

This is the BAD:
1) You do not have a demo reel that is 3 min long that shows your models spinning around so I can not tell if you understand timing or composting plus if I was going to hire you it would be the first and maybe the only thing I look at for the first 10 sec of being on your site.

2) You you don't show that you understand format. Go google "model pack" and see how other 3D artist that are working as modelers present there work. You need to demenstrate that you can speek the langquage and are not just a hobiest that is trying to break into the industry.

Y pose models are bleh specially when I see them in scan line render instead of taking the time to show me global illumination or at least HDMI Render for quick fix shots. Your locking your self out of the running with what you got so fare.

3) Last but not least you have no work xp so why should I take a risk on you? A 3D artist costs around ~40k a year. I may be able to help you here so PM me about a project I am involved in.

The point is a artist that graduates or even has a working product even if its a game mod pack he made with some friends or on his own has a better chance then you in trying for the same job because he all ready knows how to get with the program when I hire him and needs less baby sitting. I got a crew of 3 concept artist and 4 other modeling artist I need to watch over. I have a UI artist and a sound artist. I answer 10-20 emails that each one may take up to 30 min of my time pending on what they contain. Why should I take you?

==================
The Bottom Line
==================

You got talent and no one can take that away from you. Now you need to pick your industry and start networking to get in. If you want to do 3D modeling for games go join a group making a game for free.

Its long hours and may never flip a profit but you will learn more then any college class can teach you when it comes to the real world. You will also have a tangable product that you can add to your porfolio and resuma when other jon opertunitys come nocking on the door.

Artist sweat for there craft, wannabes want a quick fix to the goal, so which are u?

yaustar 09-26-2011 05:56 AM

Bad 1): Why is that a problem? He is a modeller not an animator so why is a 3 min video needed? I much prefer looking at static shots of models, UV maps, wireframes then a video of a model s[pinning round.

Bad 3): Working on a mod pack or a student is not 'work' experience. Additional, he is working on mod as linked in the posts: http://www.obmsource.com/

I do agree with you that the layout is a little poor and it does take more effort then it should to hunt for these details.


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