Get the latest Education e-news
 

Go Back   Game Career Guide Forums > Programming
Forum Home Register Members List Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-19-2009, 11:27 PM   #1
TimEdwards
Moderator
 
TimEdwards's Avatar

Activity Longevity
0/20 18/20
Today Posts
0/11 ssssss183
Location: Edmonton, AB (Outside the gates... of Bioware)
Question Computer Science Versus Computer Engineering

Hello all,

I have a very biased friend who insists that Computer Engineering would be the best for getting into the industry, but how does it measure up to a computer science degree and what does the industry think of all this?

By the way if anyone from the industry can let me know which degree is better and why or what their company employs more of I'd most certainly love to know as I have decided to go back to school (My 3D Portfolio is not cutting it versus those with years of experience sadly). I'll be going to a school with a Co-Op so my marks actually account for something instead of a giant receipt that says I got High Honors.

Also thanks in advance for any help, advice, tips, tidbits, or even just information given in this thread. I'm going back to school probably within the year if my search for information concludes. Also, I want a backup plan, so games industry specific might not be the best choice for the industry at the moment.

Sincerely,
Tim Edwards
__________________
Tim Edwards

http://tjedwards.blogspot.com/
TimEdwards is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2009, 02:14 AM   #2
Adrir
Administrator
 
Adrir's Avatar

Activity Longevity
1/20 20/20
Today Posts
0/11 sssss1467
Location: London, UK
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TimEdwards View Post
I have a very biased friend who insists that Computer Engineering would be the best for getting into the industry, but how does it measure up to a computer science degree and what does the industry think of all this?
I'm not in the industry yet, however this is the impression I've got from people I've spoken with:

It depends on the university and the content of the particular course in question. A computer science degree is what employers ask for in job adverts. However, any technical, science or maths degree is acceptable.

Both degrees should have firm foundations in mathematics and programming yet both can easily deviate from the core skillset required for a games programmer. Computer Science can venture off into the world of IT while Computer Engineering can venture off into hardware and robotics. However, the best degree, in my opinion, would be Software Engineering.
__________________
Michael 'Adrir' Scott :: Games, Virtual Worlds, Education
Networking | Current Project | Research | Teaching

Last edited by Adrir : 01-21-2009 at 04:46 PM. Reason: Grammer Error
Adrir is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2009, 02:14 PM   #3
dzeligman
Member

Activity Longevity
0/20 17/20
Today Posts
0/11 sssssss88
Default

I second Adrir's comment, it really depends on the university coursework.

Here at Nebraska CE's take less general electives, are required to take some EE, physics and some other sciences.

CS have a little bit more freedom, but also are required to take some language theory and higher level theory based courses over such things as automatons, operating systems and other things.

When it comes down to it CE is basically more low level and hardware focused.
dzeligman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2009, 12:13 AM   #4
Marco Roy
Senior Member

Activity Longevity
0/20 17/20
Today Posts
0/11 ssssss156
Location: Montreal, Canada
Default

I also agree with Adrir (and dzeligman); Software Engineering would be the best choice.

A Computer Engineering degree contains many computer hardware classes that have little, if anything, to do with the video games industry. (Unless you're working on hardware for consoles, but that's quite far from making games)
__________________
Aspiring game designer and software engineering student at École de technologie supérieure (ETS)
CONJUREIGDA ProfileLinkedIn ProfileFacebook PageMy Website
Marco Roy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2009, 03:42 AM   #5
DTR
Member

Activity Longevity
0/20 17/20
Today Posts
0/11 sssssss94
Location: Helsinki, Finland
Default

Still its quite beneficial to know a thing or two about the hardware.
But that can be easily learned with own initiative from the literature. The trick is just to realize that the knowledge on that area is useful, even though its may not be emphasized on ones degree.
DTR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2009, 05:51 AM   #6
Adrir
Administrator
 
Adrir's Avatar

Activity Longevity
1/20 20/20
Today Posts
0/11 sssss1467
Location: London, UK
Default

I would imagine that most people interested in programming would also be computer enthusiasts. Therefore they would hopefully know a lot about hardware and electronics anyway - especially if they assemble their own custom tailored machines!
__________________
Michael 'Adrir' Scott :: Games, Virtual Worlds, Education
Networking | Current Project | Research | Teaching
Adrir is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2009, 05:57 AM   #7
Gshonk
Moderator

Activity Longevity
0/20 20/20
Today Posts
0/11 ssssss831
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Default

You also learn a lot about hardware on the job.
__________________
Grant Shonkwiler()
"I would love to fix the world if someone would just give me the source code"
Website Industry blog LinkedIn
Gshonk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2009, 01:32 PM   #8
Falmil
Junior Member

Activity Longevity
0/20 16/20
Today Posts
0/11 ssssssss1
Default

What about Software Engineering vs. Computer Science?
Falmil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2009, 02:32 PM   #9
yaustar
Administrator
 
yaustar's Avatar

Activity Longevity
2/20 19/20
Today Posts
1/11 sssss2272
Location: UK
Default

Either. The former is generally more practical and the latter is more theory.
yaustar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2009, 10:54 PM   #10
aedsys
Junior Member

Activity Longevity
0/20 15/20
Today Posts
0/11 ssssssss1
Default

software engineering is mostly base on practical work and computer sciences is base on the theory about all fields. in software engineering you choose the specific courses and study them and become specialize in that area and in computer sciences you have to read all the courses including networking, software, web, databases, etc. this is the difference from my point of view
aedsys is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
All times are GMT -8. The time now is 10:26 AM.






UBM Tech