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Old 01-07-2009, 03:00 PM   #11
EvilLlama
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A short breakdown:

Computer Graphics (Computer Science department): In my school, this involves a lot of 3D calculus and I know for one project they write their raytracers. It has little to do with the actual artistic side or the act of modeling
Graphic Design: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphic_design
Visual Communication: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visual_communication
Animation: If the program includes 3D animation, then chances are modeling and texturing may come up. If it's mostly taught in 2D, it may not help as much.
Fine Arts: This is where your drawing, painting, and sculpting fall under. Some programs will just teach you the basics, others will also try to make you think like an artist.
Multimedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multimedia
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Old 12-14-2010, 04:53 AM   #12
phil101
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I would say having a strong portfolio is the most important requirement. Its also important to be patient with it and anticipate some of the industries employment habits.

For instance game developers have a habit of remembering the weakest pieces of work and it stays with them so when you go back to them to try again they already have a bad first impression. This is why its important to only show them your portfolio when you know your portfolio is ready. You can do this by putting it up to scrutiny before a developer sees it. Use portfolio forums like Polycount, a place where the artists are honest. You can then take on board their feedback to produce a strong portfolio.

Another habit which is kind of a bad habit in the industry. "Its not what you know its who you know". To have a serious chance of getting into the industry you need developers to know who you are before you apply. They are one of the most protectionist industries in the private sector so building up a list of contacts is important. You can do this by getting business cards of developer staff at game expos.

So the check list would be

1:Strong portfolio
2:Contacts
3:applications

Good luck.
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