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Old 06-02-2008, 06:33 AM   #81
yaustar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duckman View Post
another question, how long did it take you to build up your portfolio to the point where you thought it was good enough to get out there? Also, how many demos is enough for a portfolio? I have a feeling your response will be nothing is enough lol
I went along the 'lazy' route. When I decided to start looking for work, I collated my best work up to that stage (mostly assignments) and naively assumed it was enough (and lucky enough for it to be). After that, it is just a matter of refinement and iteration as you do more and more projects/work. Some get dropped and new ones get added.

I would suggest that before you send your resume and portfolio to companies, you have it reviewed and checked over by someone. You find that IGDA forums have a lot of topics about that sort of thing.
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Old 06-02-2008, 07:11 AM   #82
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Unfortunately, the majority of my coursework did not deal with topics relating t game development, except for my Artificial Intelligence course. I created a program traversing a maze using the A* algorithm, probably my only experience in something pertaining to game development. As for work, I don't think I have done anything remotely related, so it seems I will be working from scratch on this 1. Now when showing your demos, do you include your source code with it or just samples of it to show how your code is structured?
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Old 06-02-2008, 11:04 AM   #83
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Usually samples or I wait for it to be asked for by the company.
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Old 06-10-2008, 01:37 PM   #84
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Sorry if this is a bit of necromancy but I wanted to offer some words of encouragement.
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So what is your advice for me when I think that I am ready in terms of having a solid portfolio and wanting to apply for jobs? I'm referring to the "cold call" issue.
Apply anyway. If you did a good enough job preparing it will look like you have the experience. Fresh blood is hired all the time, but only after they show they can walk in the door, hit the ground running and add something to the team.

I should also mention that people applying for the first time tend to hit the big companies first. Which will only end in heartache. You'll more then likely want to get in someplace smaller and start to build a name for yourself. Think of it as getting in line behind all the other people who have the same goal and been at it longer. If thats too much of a downer, think of it as a chance to get paid, to create a portfolio and hone your skills.

It is possible to put together a portfolio of that caliber and never work a day in the industry or ever go to school. You don't have to lie and claim experience but you do have to ready yourself and put one hell of a portfolio together. You want them to look at your work and head over to your resume to find out what games you've worked on and be shocked that you have none listed.

It's put in there so if they need to bounce the 100+ resumes from people with badly ZBrushed piggy banks and sparking clean dumpsters, they can. If you've gotten an email that says;
"sorry we're looking for someone with more experience"
What that really should say, is;
"we aren't wowed at all, what you have isn't up to the industry minimum, we would like if you where to apply again, that you redo every piece in your portfolio a few times until you get the hang of it." But that hurts feelings and puts conditions on applying again that might not be fair.

I should probably mention that most people reviewing portfolios will assume that if you send one in, you meet the minimum requirements and will head off to your gallery first. You can use that to your advantage, you'll get a call if the work they see is up to speed regardless of shipped titles and experience.

I don't know a single hiring Art Director that would turn down a candidate that looks like they can do the job, even if technically they lack the experience on paper. If they've already proven they can do the job, they'll get a call.

I would also like to second learning python, (and take a look at MaxScript and MEL), to any programmers who are looking for a language. Those three get used to build tools for artists to use. It's the glue that holds our pipelines together and keeps the artists from drowning in a sea of techno-babble and repetition. A few steps automated, an few hours saved means people have more time for what matters.

I know a few programmers who got into the industry by programing tools for artists to use, some of them are semi-decent artists themselves so they knew what needed to be made. Others have asked, and filled needs. They straddle the fence and are good at listening and problem solving, we call them technical artists. The first time one of these wizards takes hours of tedium off your hands, you'll know why they are hired even if they can't code up a 3D engine from scratch.

Last edited by Vig : 06-11-2008 at 03:23 PM. Reason: More junk to add...
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