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Old 06-19-2008, 05:55 AM   #11
iL DuCe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TG1 View Post
I actually thought about it the other way around - by using the given scenario I will show an ability to adapt and be creative in unfamiliar situations (ie - a scenario I never thought about myself and this is the first time I'm handling it), creating my own scenario (probably something I though about before) is a bit like avoiding the unfamiliar one and might not look good in an interview. (I look at it as if someone asked me what is 1+1 and I chose to answer what is 1+3 instead)

Another good point. However, given the idea behind this design challenge, we are not immediately forced to come up with a solution on the spot. I was merely stating that coming up with my own unique scenario shows creativity. I see your point as well though. In an interview, using your own scenario may look appear scripted rather than a legitimate attempt to answer the question.

Regardless, the alternative idea I came up with was actually developed stream of thought

Last edited by iL DuCe : 06-19-2008 at 05:59 AM.
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Old 06-19-2008, 07:02 AM   #12
Protector one
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I've always been fond of the helper companions that provide cues throughout games (Navi - OoT, Issun - Okami). But it would be rather cheap to introduce an entire character (that would need to be present through some part of the game, at least) to solve this one problem.
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Old 06-19-2008, 08:28 AM   #13
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Well, in Oblivion, you occasionally get locked in jail.

Their cue is a text box that explains to you what you can do...
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Old 06-19-2008, 05:15 PM   #14
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This is a really good post. If any of you are interviewing any time soon, this pertains to you.

Yes, interviewers LIKE for you to ask follow-up questions. People who ask before they react are usually adept problem-solvers.

For this scenario, you can answer those questions on your own. In your submission, you might pretend that you asked those questions, and then invent the answers you're given, too.

Go wild, my friend!

Quote:
Originally Posted by TG1 View Post
  • what stage in the game the player is in (in the beginning of the game the player will need more clues then in a more advanced stage. also, is this the first time the player encounters the prison cell?)
  • why is he in the prison cell
  • does he need to do anything there (gather information? save another prisoner?) or just escape
  • is being in the cell part of the game's story or something that happens if the player fails a mission?
  • is there only one way to leave the cell or several options?

I wonder how the dynammics are during a job interview - will I be able to ask about these points or will I have to state my assumptions and go from there?
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Old 06-19-2008, 07:43 PM   #15
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A nice challenge. I am going to start with what a prison can be and take it from there.
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Old 06-19-2008, 10:11 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MattyGamer View Post
A nice challenge. I am going to start with what a prison can be and take it from there.
Here's hoping you take the 'prison can be basically a country-club with guards, for white-collar crime, like embezzlement' rather than 'prison can be basically hell' route.
Might as well mix it up, eh?
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Old 06-20-2008, 05:29 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ronnoc10 View Post
Here's hoping you take the 'prison can be basically a country-club with guards, for white-collar crime, like embezzlement' rather than 'prison can be basically hell' route.
Might as well mix it up, eh?
Even if you have a minimum security prison, how does the player know where to go to escape? How does the player know that her next step in the game is to escape? What are the cues and clues?
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Old 06-20-2008, 05:38 AM   #18
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I guess the best way to tackle the problem is to implement progressive hinting. At first no clues at all, after a set time without progress a guard could mumble something remotely linked to the answer. Later still, he could simply describe part of the answer.
Of course, this progressive hinting could come in all sorts of forms, even to the point of gradually changing the appearance of the answer object/area.
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Old 06-20-2008, 08:40 AM   #19
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That depends, in my opinion, on what the larger scenario is - working with the prison motif you still have motivations, overall story, demeanors to write about - writing (literature) might be the best influence here, because you can generally get good ideas about the how and why (intent) of where and who you are playing, and from there 'appropriate' cues will become apparent.

For instance (because I haven't been able to share anything on the forums before ) I am very fond of a story I'm writing that involves an oppressive, homegrown religious regime. So in the scenario I am using to showcase level design skills, my character is imprisoned across from a guy modeled on bradd pitt from 12 monkeys, and the guards are volunteers - effectively sunday school leaders. There's a morality play that becomes central to escaping, along with me wanting to let the player feel what it is to be imprisoned against their will. So there won't be an immediate way out, despite the necessity of working on a way out the whole time.

If you get creative enough with your writing, you can put very obvious or necessary pieces of the puzzle on the walls in the cryptic scratchings of a previous prisoner, for example. OR, as is my favorite piece of my puzzle, you can give false clues and dead ends - the psychological aspect of putting someone in a prison cell is your most fertile ground.
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Old 06-20-2008, 08:42 AM   #20
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what does the player want to escape to might be a good end to tie up as well.
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