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Old 02-22-2009, 11:08 AM   #31
solarnoise
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As a computer science student who is trying to ready himself for a programming or design role in a game company someday, the OP's topic really rubbed me the wrong way.

I was once a mechanical engineering major, working in a bio-medical company doing software validation, and I was so completely and utterly disinterested in my work because no two people got alone beyond the boring "ice breaker" talk because no one was passionate about what they were doing. We were all there to do the most cost-effective and precise work as possible, and there was absolutely no need for anyone to like what they were doing or put anything extra into their projects.

One day in my apartment I stopped to look at my DVD shelf which houses over one hundred of what I would call masterpieces that others would simply label "RPG video games". Staring long and hard I knew what I had to do, and that was follow my passion. I want to be working in an environment where it is the opposite of what the OP said: my skills as a programmer or designer should be the given, it is the passion that gets me the job that I want.

Currently as a student I work with other students to have fun, play games, and create games so that we can live in some kind of microcosm of what we'd like to do someday. And let me tell you something, there is a reason why we don't go looking for the kids with the highest GPA in math, programming, etc: we'd rather be passionate about our work, and hone our skills together, than simply be technically brilliant and churn out something we don't like.
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Old 02-22-2009, 02:26 PM   #32
Adrir
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solarnoise View Post
Currently as a student I work with other students to have fun, play games, and create games so that we can live in some kind of microcosm of what we'd like to do someday.
That's awesome! I'm trying to encourage more of this with the Game Creators Club at my university, however it is tough only having one other programmer besides myself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by solarnoise View Post
There is a reason why we don't go looking for the kids with the highest GPA in math, programming, etc: we'd rather be passionate about our work, and hone our skills together, than simply be technically brilliant and churn out something we don't like.
Who's to say the people with the highest GPA in maths and programming arn't passionate about their work?

Unless you are naturally talented, I feel passion is a requisite for anything you want to excel in. This is especially in a field like computer games. Everytime you reach a milestone, you realise just how much futher the ahead road is. You realise how much you need to do in order to achieve your goals. Passion will keep you going. Especially if the skills you are developing arn't part of a taught curriculum!

People with the highest GPAs are usually people who work really hard because they are passionate about what they do. There are a few lucky exceptions to this thesis however...
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Old 02-23-2009, 10:19 AM   #33
DTR
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Just gotta add in the classic quote regarding education:


An interesting question:
is it easier to motivate a learned individual
that never does anything,
or educate an ignorant individual
that actually produces things?

- John Carmack
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Old 02-27-2009, 07:21 AM   #34
nef
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solarnoise View Post
As a computer science student who is trying to ready himself for a programming or design role in a game company someday, the OP's topic really rubbed me the wrong way.

I was once a mechanical engineering major, working in a bio-medical company doing software validation, and I was so completely and utterly disinterested in my work because no two people got alone beyond the boring "ice breaker" talk because no one was passionate about what they were doing. We were all there to do the most cost-effective and precise work as possible, and there was absolutely no need for anyone to like what they were doing or put anything extra into their projects.

One day in my apartment I stopped to look at my DVD shelf which houses over one hundred of what I would call masterpieces that others would simply label "RPG video games". Staring long and hard I knew what I had to do, and that was follow my passion. I want to be working in an environment where it is the opposite of what the OP said: my skills as a programmer or designer should be the given, it is the passion that gets me the job that I want.

Currently as a student I work with other students to have fun, play games, and create games so that we can live in some kind of microcosm of what we'd like to do someday. And let me tell you something, there is a reason why we don't go looking for the kids with the highest GPA in math, programming, etc: we'd rather be passionate about our work, and hone our skills together, than simply be technically brilliant and churn out something we don't like.
I don't think you got my point. It got drawn out over the discussions but to sum it up:

Passion for code > Passion for games, as a coder.

That's what im saying. There are billions of people that are passionate for games, but that dosn't make them great candidates for coding, not even designing. Be passionate about what you do.
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Old 02-27-2009, 06:51 PM   #35
nef
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTR View Post
Just gotta add in the classic quote regarding education:


An interesting question:
is it easier to motivate a learned individual
that never does anything,
or educate an ignorant individual
that actually produces things?

- John Carmack
Hmm, I think it would be easier to educate the ignorant individual, but not always the best method.

It depends on the person and I think that's what Carmack was getting at. IMO, a person who is passionate about code would have the motivation whcih means if they need help than the second part applies, educating the ignorant. I think it will always be easier to just educate the ignorant. But you need to determine if the ignorant person you are educating is motivated enough to take it to heart.

A person only passionate about games wouldn't, but someone who is passionate about their code and what it does, is, IMO, more applicable to being influenced by strong design or coding decisions than someone who isn't.

To sum up, I would rather work w/ the less experienced individual who is more interested in learning. Thus the individual who is more friendly to learning is my candidate.
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