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Old 07-10-2009, 04:15 PM   #1
ScHiZo
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Default Keeping an Optimistic Attitude

I was just wondering what everyone is doing to keep an optimistic attitude during their job search. I find myself getting discouraged at times, especially after a phone interview where the interviewer doesn't let you know whether you got the job or not (black-hole). My current strategy to fight this is to try to be productive by working on my game projects. Is this enough for you or do you have another strategy?
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Old 07-10-2009, 04:34 PM   #2
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I'd just try to work with others on game projects so you're more motivate to keep working on them and eventually you'll have something worthwhile to show that will aid your job search.
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Old 07-11-2009, 02:21 AM   #3
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I usually just go to the pub once a week with my friends. ^^ Working on the portfolio is a given.
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Old 07-11-2009, 06:01 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScHiZo View Post
I was just wondering what everyone is doing to keep an optimistic attitude during their job search. I find myself getting discouraged at times, especially after a phone interview where the interviewer doesn't let you know whether you got the job or not (black-hole). My current strategy to fight this is to try to be productive by working on my game projects. Is this enough for you or do you have another strategy?
A phone interview is usually just a screen to see if they want a face to face interview.
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Old 07-11-2009, 12:07 PM   #5
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Yeah I know Yaustar.. I meant whether to continue the application process or not, but I understand they just want to go through as many people as they can.
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Old 07-15-2009, 12:20 PM   #6
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Take heart in the fact that at least you're getting phone interviews!

And hey, be glad that you've done the hard work to build your skills up to the point where you're actively seeking. I know we all continue to work on our skills, but I think I have at least six months of self-study before I can even think about trying to get an interview.
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Old 07-15-2009, 04:02 PM   #7
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Take heart in the fact that at least you're getting phone interviews!

And hey, be glad that you've done the hard work to build your skills up to the point where you're actively seeking. I know we all continue to work on our skills, but I think I have at least six months of self-study before I can even think about trying to get an interview.
After looking for almost a year now, I'm not very proud of the fact that I've only gotten maybe 10 phone interviews (some I wouldn't even call real phone interviews ). The typical phone interview for me starts off well. Most ask me questions that they can get the answers for on their own if they just spend a couple of minutes looking at my resume. I then get asked technical questions of all kinds of topics, some that stump me completely. The funny thing is that when you're working in an actual game company, you usually lookup whatever it is that you're having trouble with. Just because I don't know much about quaternions (I've mainly used matrices in my past experiences) beside them representing an angle doesn't mean I can't look it up right after and utilize them. When I first started working for a game company, that's what I did and I learned fast. I'm sure the interviewer's own coworkers probably can't answer some of the questions that have been asked of me because I've been on the other side of the fence and asked my coworkers (senior programmers) if they knew the answers. I just hope that some day I get a chance to show them what I've done face to face because that's really proof that you can do what you say. That could be my problem right there is that I'm more of a do'er than a say'er, so I'm not very good at phone interviews. On the bright side, atleast I'm gaining more experience at doing them and building a large database of technical questions in my head
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Old 07-16-2009, 07:27 AM   #8
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I think sometimes interviewers are testing not only what you know, but also how you respond to things you don't know. There are some good technical test ideas in this thread; I think it would be great if you added some of the questions you've been asked in the technical portions of your phone interviews

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I then get asked technical questions of all kinds of topics, some that stump me completely.
I'm sure that happens to everyone. Why not make a game to learn the solutions? For example, you could create a demo that utilizes quaternions and anything else you got stumped on.

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I just hope that some day I get a chance to show them what I've done face to face because that's really proof that you can do what you say.
Just curious, do you have an online portfolio? I would think that would be just as (if not more) effective for showing what you can do.
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Old 07-16-2009, 11:11 AM   #9
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Just curious, do you have an online portfolio? I would think that would be just as (if not more) effective for showing what you can do.
Yeah, I have an online portfolio, but I can't put up the source code for the projects I've work on there because of NDAs/not my IP. There's also the case where I don't want to give out the source for games I own because it could piss off my sponsor (e.g. remove my sponsor's branding and insert their own) or potentially ruin a game community (e.g. people making unique versions of my multiplayer mod). If I'm face-to-face with an interviewer, I can show them the source without this problem. I can send them the source through e-mail (I do this upon request), but I doubt they actually take the time to go through it. You really need the person who worked on it to show you what he/she did and why. This is how I nailed my first job in the games industry, and I hope I get this chance again...
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Old 07-17-2009, 07:56 AM   #10
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I think it's obvious you can't give out source for anything you don't own. I don't understand your comment about upsetting your sponsor or the concern about people expanding your mod (you based the mod on somebody else's original game, right?), but there's no need to give out full source anyway.

Simply adding some screenshots and code samples of hobby projects that fairly demonstrate your abilities should be enough. It doesn't seem realistic for an interviewer to sit down with applicants and review their code line for line. Getting a glimpse of what you can do and then letting the dev team shred your technical test should be enough

Disclaimer: I'm not in the industry yet so you have to take my advice with a grain of salt. I'm recommending mostly what I've seen in other online portfolios and hope it helps.
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