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Old 09-25-2009, 12:29 AM   #61
lostgamedev
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boojum View Post
Again we're bending the rules?
Ken Vermeille's "Vivi and the Fairies" sits at a robust 863 words. It's certainly closer to 1000 than it is 500. If we aren't going to actually abide by the rules of the competition can there at least be a formal announcement changing the rules or giving us broader guidelines?

On an unrelated note, it seems a good amount of people are focusing on DSi or iPhone games. So the touch screens bring a whole other component to the mix. Are we graded on this as well? Is there any advantage to using a system that doesn't have all the bells and whistles? It seems the grading relies very little on story and much more on that hook (Scribblenauts anybody?). I'm not complaining, just trying to understand the process. If we were given a clearer objective (perhaps even telling us which system to create the game) this would help us to cater to what the "masses" (the judges) really want.

Thoughts?
This thread is starting to amuse me.

I think assigning a platform for design challenges would miss the point completely. Unless the challenge specifically indicated what system to use (like the DSi challenge), it should be free for all when it comes to platform. It's the design that matters, after all, even if the platform itself doesn't have "all the bells and whistles."

As for the text length, I think cnutt already answered this one (http://gamecareerguide.com/forums/sh...9&postcount=46). A lengthy design doesn't necessarily mean it's good. From what I've read so far -- this challenge included -- some design ideas are too broad, hence a length. Try to focus on the good stuff, the 'core' concept, rather than the inconsequential features. You can dwell on them, I suppose, but don't expect the judges (whoever they are) will. Other people tend to focus more on the story rather than the design itself, which will do them no good given the limitations.

But hey, maybe I'm wrong.

Last edited by lostgamedev : 09-25-2009 at 01:21 AM.
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Old 09-25-2009, 01:12 AM   #62
Graedius
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lostgamedev View Post
This thread is starting to amuse me.

I think assigning a platform for design challenges would miss the point completely. Unless the challenge specifically indicated what system to use (like the DSi challenge), it should be free for all when it comes to platform. It's the design that matters, after all, even if the platform itself doesn't have "all the bells and whistles."

As for the text length, I think cnutt already answered this one (http://gamecareerguide.com/forums/sh...9&postcount=46). A lengthy design doesn't necessarily mean it's good. From what I've read so far -- this challenge included -- some design ideas are too broad, hence a lengthy design. Try to focus on the good stuff, the 'core' concept, rather than the inconsequential features. You can dwell on them, I suppose, but don't expect the judges (whoever they are) will. Other people tend to focus more on the story rather than the design itself, which will do them no good given the limitations.

But hey, maybe I'm wrong.
Good points you have there, lostgamedev. I'd like to add my two cents, if it's okay

As a game designer by trade, I believe that limitations set the standards for an excellent design. Whenever we work on a proposal, the things we always take into account are the length of the document and the limitations of the mockups.

A good game pitch, in my opinion, is something that sends the message across with as few words as possible. If you can deliver an effective pitch in five hundred words or less, with as few pictures as possible, then you have a huge chance of getting the project. Clients will never take the time to read through a lengthy 1000 word document with four or more mockups.

I agree with concentrating on the core concept of a design rather than focusing on the story. You are making a game, not a novel. Your aim is to create something that will engage the player in the systems you have conceptualized. You're not making a game to make the player understand your story. Even story-driven games such as Heavy Rain and Mirror's Edge focus on selling the core concepts of their product, such as near-full interactivity (for Heavy Rain) or fight-or-flight controls (for Mirror's Edge).

To summarize, what defines a really good game are the systems you create and how you use them to keep the player engaged in the story you've made.

Thanks, and I look forward to seeing more awesome concepts in the near future!
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