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Old 10-12-2009, 06:21 PM   #1
Darkelv404
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Okay so I am 16 and a junior in high school and I would love to get into video game programming. There are not any classes at my school that are remotely near the subject. I have no idea really where to get started (or at least a good source). I have no experience with programming (other than some HTML). What does anyone recommend?
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Old 10-12-2009, 10:46 PM   #2
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If there aren't any computer classes in your high school, see if you can take evening classes in your city. Talk to your guidance counselor -- he or she may have some suggestions.
And you don't need to act pathetic to get us to help you. We do it even for people who aren't "lost"! (^_^)
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Old 10-13-2009, 08:17 AM   #3
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I'd tell you that you don't need to be in a class about something to learn about that something. You can probably also, learn that something faster on your own than by taking a class about it anyway, but I'm a big self learner. Barnes and Noble and google are two of the greatest resources you will ever find.
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Old 10-14-2009, 03:21 AM   #4
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Haha that's a very abstract comment. True though, a good thing to do if you want to become a games programmer, is to just try it out and see how far you get. I'd recommend trying Microsoft XNA (http://creators.xna.com), which you can get for free. Then just follow some simple tutorials, until you get the hang of what does what.
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Old 10-14-2009, 05:14 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Claxon View Post
Haha that's a very abstract comment.
Which comment above are you referring to?
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Old 10-15-2009, 02:04 PM   #6
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I honestly think it is a little difficult to first learn programming from a book. I would suggest trying to find a night class or at least a mentor to help you learn.
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Old 10-15-2009, 03:33 PM   #7
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Everyone has their own learning styles. The "Books + Online Resources + Practical Exercises" works pretty well for me. Although, I do find it easier to understand things having gone through them with a group of friends.

Find one that works for you!
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Old 10-16-2009, 07:26 AM   #8
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The downside to teaching yourself entirely is that you'll tend to avoid learning things that don't want to learn, but are extremely important. School forces these topics on you.

You should be applying for colleges soon. Teach yourself in the mean time, this way if you decide to take up computer science you'll have a leg up on most students.
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Old 10-16-2009, 07:34 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ndimucci View Post
The downside to teaching yourself entirely is that you'll tend to avoid learning things that don't want to learn, but are extremely important. School forces these topics on you.
+1 on that.

Those forced things have a tendency of being the most valuable thing you ever learn in the long run.
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Old 10-18-2009, 05:38 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ndimucci View Post
The downside to teaching yourself entirely is that you'll tend to avoid learning things that don't want to learn, but are extremely important. School forces these topics on you.
Also when teaching yourself you tend to learn bad programming habits.
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