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Old 11-02-2009, 04:08 PM   #1
erdirck
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Default how many or how big programs should be in portfolios

I was wondering when I should stop programming my game and work on a new one. I know that on a job, people have deadlines but I am making a java game for my portfolio and I take as much time as I can get when I work on it. However, I am trying to get a job soon and was wondering if employers are looking for a lot of programs or a few "big" programs. There seems like there are endless possibilities for my game, but I don't want to put too much time into it when I can be working on something else that's more beneficial to my portfolio.
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Old 11-02-2009, 04:13 PM   #2
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The cop out answer is 'when it is finished and presentable'. If you are working on a game, then it is most likely to be finished when you have implemented all the features. If you are making features as you go then you need to step back and work out what features are needed for it to be 'finished'.
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Old 11-02-2009, 04:42 PM   #3
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that's what I am trying to figure out. I am adding features as I go so without the feature, I am thinking maybe I should have done that.. How do I know what features are needed and what aren't?
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Old 11-02-2009, 05:20 PM   #4
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Sit down and write what the core fun is in the game. What are the least amount of features you can remove and the game still is playable? Then see if you have all of those features in.

When I write a design document I assign Features a priority from A-C. Once all of the A features are in the game is playable, the B are features to polish up the As and some more added features. C features and lower (D) are just added fluff that the game doesn't need.
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Old 11-02-2009, 05:24 PM   #5
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ah ok, cool, thanks
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Old 11-03-2009, 11:08 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erdirck View Post
I was wondering when I should stop programming my game and work on a new one.
When it is finished.

Quote:
Originally Posted by erdirck View Post
I know that on a job, people have deadlines but I am making a java game for my portfolio and I take as much time as I can get when I work on it.
But you don't have a deadline.

Is it presentable? Is it fun? Does it work? Are you proud with the outcome? If not, then keep going.

Quote:
Originally Posted by erdirck View Post
I am trying to get a job soon and was wondering if employers are looking for a lot of programs or a few "big" programs.
Employers are looking for evidence that you can do what the job requires. A portfolio must deliver this evidence. Preferably with some impact. Numbers don't matter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by erdirck View Post
There seems like there are endless possibilities for my game, but I don't want to put too much time into it when I can be working on something else that's more beneficial to my portfolio.
Don't place all of your eggs into one basket but don't make a lot of games with equally poor standards. Furthermore, unless you are trying to improve upon a previous attempt, there is no point rewriting the same code over and over again!

Just keep doing what you have fun doing and if you realise there is something you don't know - then work it in. If it doesn't fit in the game you're working on then you know you need to move on to something in which it will. Once you've finished your current project, then move on to that one.
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