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Old 12-16-2009, 11:52 PM   #41
bob
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Awesome job on the graphics. Very nice. I also like the educational bent.

But...

I think you could have come up with something more creative and original than another "tap the graphic in time with the beat" game.

I can see how it could be useful for teaching how notes go together. But if that's really the goal, you could have been a lot more direct about it with your design.

I like the idea of casting spells, but it still seems pretty simplistic. Would it really feel different from Elite Beat Agents, except I get to choose which glowing thing I hit?

Also, how have you reconciled people getting to create their own sounds while at the same time requiring them to cast certain spells in order to solve puzzles?
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Old 12-17-2009, 12:50 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bob View Post
Awesome job on the graphics. Very nice. I also like the educational bent.

But...

I think you could have come up with something more creative and original than another "tap the graphic in time with the beat" game.

I can see how it could be useful for teaching how notes go together. But if that's really the goal, you could have been a lot more direct about it with your design.

I like the idea of casting spells, but it still seems pretty simplistic. Would it really feel different from Elite Beat Agents, except I get to choose which glowing thing I hit?

Also, how have you reconciled people getting to create their own sounds while at the same time requiring them to cast certain spells in order to solve puzzles?
Heya Bob. Thanks for reading the design and giving me your feedback. And here's my reply

To begin with, Crescendo Flow is a vast design. There's only so much that can be explained in 500 words, and I plan to make this design a reality in the future, for my enjoyment and for the others who will play it.

The game's meant to be a casual game, to encourage people of all ages to play and eventually pick up on the lessons the game has to offer, hence I wanted to make the design simple and straightforward, focusing on the core mechanics that drive it.

Tapping the glyphs in time to the beat can't be avoided since this is still partly a rhythm game. However like I mentioned, it deviates from the rhythm game genre by improving on certain core mechanics, allowing the player to choose the path of his or her sound as well as changing the tempo depending on which buttons are tapped or dragged. Dragging towards a button is also optional, which allows for a sustained sound to be generated by the game.

Another thing that makes Crescendo Flow different from other Rhythm games is the fact that you're composing songs by tapping or dragging on the glyphs. This isn't like Ouendan where the whole song plays on even if you make a mistake. In this game, you are in charge of completing a layer of the entire song. Fail to tap on a glyph, and you won't hear that particular note play, making the song incomplete. An excellent performance allows you to hear the entire song.

As for the spellcasting mechanic, since this is still a game, after I've established the core mechanics I felt it wrong to not add even at least just one feature to spice things up. If you'll look closely, I mentioned that the player CAN activate the Cast glyph, but it's not required to complete the level. The core objective is to keep the Crescendo gauge at a certain level at the end of the song.

Also take note that the Cast glyphs create sound too, allowing players to memorize spells based on how they sound. This allows for a more RPG-ish or adventure-ish feel to the game.

Again, the 500 word limit does not do this design justice, but the important thing is that I've made the core mechanics clear. That is, after all, the basic rule of every game pitch.

I plan to create a GDD for this game in the near future, and after that, who knows? The possibilities are endless for this design.

Again, thanks! And I look forward to seeing a lot of awesome entries in this challenge.

Last edited by Graedius : 12-17-2009 at 06:01 AM.
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Old 12-17-2009, 08:23 AM   #43
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I used Scribblenauts as the inspiration for my submission. I'm fascinated by being able to interact with a game environment beyond timed button pressing. That's why I chose to use music as a means of interacting with the game.
With Scribblenauts users input words and use words to overcome various challenges. I just replaced using words with recording music and other audio. Since I love free-roaming rpgs like Fable, I imagine a similar mechanics for my game with a bit of a Jet Grind Radio style and feel.

Last edited by Pirates0nFire : 12-17-2009 at 08:25 AM.
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Old 12-17-2009, 03:14 PM   #44
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Hey Pirates,

You should post your whole submission so we can really understand what you're getting at. It seems interesting.

Here's mine:

"Deathbed Album"
---------------------------------
You know how memories can get associated with songs?

Deathbed Album is the story of an inspired Japanese teenager named Takano. In one week, he will go to any length for glory. GLORY! Why?! His Deathbed Album. So he can press play on his uPod as he hits self-destruct on a space shuttle’s console, forever associating that moment with a song off his favourite band’s new CD. So that on his deathbed his favourite songs will recall the greatest moments of his life.

There are 12 chapters, one for each track on the album. Within each chapter there are dozens of possible outcomes, but through clever plot devices they are tied together. The game is about using creativity to find the most incredible, glorious achievement. It’s about looking up at the tallest building in the world and knowing you’re going to climb it – or die trying.

Levels are creative sandboxes(a bank, a stadium, a space shuttle, etc) and each one is full of useful NPCs that could help you do any number of things. The best finales will go to the most creative players, but maintaining the feeling of agency is paramount.

An example:
Chapter 11 finds Takano onboard a nuclear submarine, just pulled out of the Pacific Ocean after he successfully initiated the self-destruct mechanism of a space shuttle on a collision course with the international space station (and last week he was delivering pizzas!). To maintain the illusion of agency, most possible finales will not be obvious, so the player won’t feel cheated if they fail to reach the cooler finales. Perceptive players thinking creatively might pick up on the submarine captain’s disgruntlement with life in general and his tendency to get liquored up. Eventually, if the player kept their eyes open, they would see an opportunity to convince the captain to go rogue. Then they could hold the world hostage with the sub’s payload.

-
Some others:
Launch nuke at deserted island
Get gay sailors to confront their captain about “don’t ask/don’t tell”
-

However the player has chosen to beat the chapter, the pace will quicken as the suspense builds and Takano nears his perfect, glorious moment. IT’S TIME! HIT PLAY! REMEMBER THIS MOMENT! But be careful – songs are only three minutes long and the most important part of the memory will be at the very end, as the world goes up in flames - metaphorically. This means the player needs to ensure they complete the chapter before the song ends. Pressing play on his mp3 player sends Katano into overdrive as he strives to create the most incredible memory he possibly can. Adrenaline makes him faster, stronger, louder and more persuasive – crucial for swinging up to the very top of the empire state building, punching Kim Jong Il in the face or parlaying wittily with the UN Security Council (GLORIOUS!) on the submarine’s telecommunications monitor. That is, before Godzilla sinks the sub on his way to invade Japan. Chapter 12: The final track. Save Japan.
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Old 12-17-2009, 05:44 PM   #45
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P.S. Someone made an awesome music game called Audio Surf. It's on Steam.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPaCQ...eature=related
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Old 12-17-2009, 09:04 PM   #46
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Looking back over the posts, my game idea is actually a little similar to dreamshade's.

RIFF WORLD
Riff World has the outward appearance of your typical free-roaming role playing game (like Fable 2), but it is the ability to alter Riff World with recordings from the real world that set it apart.
Riff World is a game that allows players to interact with a game environment using recordings of their favorite music riffs and other sounds. Players can use custom audio recordings as tools of destruction, to promote a constructive and growing environment, or use them to overcome predetermined Riff World challenges.
Steps:
1. Choose a customizable audio ‘weapon’ for your avatar from Riff World’s limitless arsenal of instruments and advanced audio devices.
2. Record yourself playing an instrument, yelling, singing, burping, clapping, or a short section of a song or Hollywood sound effect.
3. Alter your recordings using the in game audio emulator and synthesizer.
4. Apply the recording to a button or key.
5. Experiment with your sounds, examining what effects your sounds create in Riff World.
6. Master your sounds to overcome challenges, promote productivity, or to cause mayhem.
Story Challenge Example:
Ninjas are rabbit-napping all the bunnies from the Riff World Petting Zoo. What will you do!?
A player may choose to utilize a quick sound with a high pitch and amplitude that will act as a piercing attack on the ninjas. Another may use a deep roar to rumble the ground and frighten the ninjas. A more advanced method would be playing a recording of rhythmic war drums that inspire the bunnies to join forces and fight back.
Construction Example:
You see a violent and dirty slum that is in need of some love.
By playing an industrial loop with hard repeating mechanical sounds citizens are inspired to get to work, making repairs and upgrading the condition of the buildings in the slum. Slow peaceful music causes violent neighbors to look past their differences, and hold each other as they cry.
Destruction Example:
A crowd of citizens is in the way of your avatar’s walking. Use heavy metal guitar solos to blast away obstacles or deep bass drones to shake foundations. A solid deep drum whack acts as a force push, knocking anything near the player’s avatar away.
Even more interesting is the secret Riff World effects that come from playing recordings of famous songs. The Rolling Stones “Paint it Black” could turn everything in Riff World black. The Beatles “Yellow Submarine” summons a psychedelic flying yellow submarine. There’s almost unlimited room for secret effects.
Without a doubt Riff World would provide exciting and innovative challenges to players. It will also be an interesting challenge for programmers and game designers.
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Old 12-17-2009, 10:49 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bob View Post
P.S. Someone made an awesome music game called Audio Surf. It's on Steam.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPaCQ...eature=related
I'm not sure if you telling us of this game's existence is just you being sarcastic or not.
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Old 12-18-2009, 12:22 AM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tlovemark View Post
I'm not sure if you telling us of this game's existence is just you being sarcastic or not.
No, no sarcasm. I thought the people reading this thread would like seeing another take on making a music game. It's small in scope, too, which reminded me of us and our own fledgling natures.
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Old 12-22-2009, 01:08 PM   #49
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Results are up!

http://gamecareerguide.com/features/...me_design_.php

Congrats to all.
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Old 12-22-2009, 03:53 PM   #50
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A game based on a sequencer rather than the music directly... that's actually some great out-of-the-box thinking. I approve.

(And how did I end up placing? I must've just thrown in so much audio jargon that the judges thought I knew what I was talking about. :p )
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Last edited by dreamshade : 12-22-2009 at 04:16 PM.
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