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Old 12-30-2007, 02:47 AM   #11
Crastin
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Old topic I know but i've been swamped with school so just getting back to the forums here. I was reading more about "Scrum" and trying to understand how it would effect the creative power of a Game Designer. Any thoughts?
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Old 12-30-2007, 09:45 AM   #12
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SCRUM as in Agile software development? If done incorrectly, it becomes a major hindrance to all involved especially when sprint planning and daily stand-ups take longer then they should.

Effectively, the designers and producers become the customer and continuously review the product and possibly change the goals if they find that something they thought was good on paper doesn't turn out well when implemented. The opposite could also happen as in something that they thought was minor was implemented and they then found out was good fun, the feature could be expanded.

It also allows them to prioritise more important game aspects early in the project by defining the goals and also predict how much of the game could realistically be done based on the amount of work that is done per sprint in the previous ones.

In terms of creative power, it does very little besides being able to review the product more often and earlier based on what goals have been completed. If something doesn't turn out right, at worse, only a sprints worth of work is wasted. Essentially, it is game development in baby steps towards the goal.

This is just a general overview of the designer's role in game developments from SCRUM in my experience. It may differ with other companies.
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Old 12-30-2007, 11:57 AM   #13
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Well the part of scrum that seemed efficient was the ability to cut out what doesn't work quicker, allowing the team to work on what is working is the theory I believe. From a Game Designer point of view I saw the sprints and constant meetings as a way to convince the higher ups that what you envision will work, although it could work both ways and they decide to cut something early.
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Old 12-30-2007, 12:09 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crastin View Post
Well the part of scrum that seemed efficient was the ability to cut out what doesn't work quicker, allowing the team to work on what is working is the theory I believe. From a Game Designer point of view I saw the sprints and constant meetings as a way to convince the higher ups that what you envision will work, although it could work both ways and they decide to cut something early.
The sprints and stand ups are for progression reports. The 'convince' stages are done outside these meetings where the stories are constructed.
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Old 12-30-2007, 12:14 PM   #15
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Oh, then I suppose any hope of continuing a struggling idea isn't more fathomable with scrum. I'm glad I asked though thanks for correcting me. Possibly my hardest adaptation to game design will be to let go of my creative ideas during the development. It's something i'm trying to prepare for.
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Old 12-30-2007, 12:36 PM   #16
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What SCRUM does allow for though (given the stage of development) is to prototype a certain element of gameplay before completely dismissing it. For example, a story could be "As a player, I want to be able throw balls at enemies". At the end of the sprint, the feature can be evaluated for expansion, deletion or keep 'as is'.

You may want to read: http://www.gamasutra.com/view/featur...m_project_.php

As for letting go of your ideas, look at Duke Nuk 'em Forever, that is what happens when you don't let go. It must of been in development for a decade IIRC.

Last edited by yaustar : 12-30-2007 at 12:58 PM.
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Old 12-30-2007, 01:21 PM   #17
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I'm sure I can deal with it. As I learn more it really seems that a game designer is a salesman in many ways. I have to sell the game to the money holders first, then sell the more intricate details to the various members in my team in a way that will inspire them and make them work hard on that detail which will hopefully cause more of the details to come into fruition.
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