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  • Goldsmiths, University of London

    -- London, England 
  • Goldsmiths College, University of London
    Department of Computing, New Cross
    London, England SE14 6NW
    GB
  • +44 (0)2079197850 or +44 (0)2070785052
  • ffl@gold.ac.uk
  • http://www.gamesgoldsmiths.com
  • MSc Computer Games & Entertainment (MSc, 1 Years)
    For a position in Programming / Software Engineering

  • Campus:Yes         Online: No
  • In state: 4080 UK/EU; British Pounds Sterling (GBP) per Full Program
    Out of state: 13500 USA; British Pounds Sterling (GBP) per Full Program
    Non-US National (Overseas Students): 13500 else; British Pounds Sterling (GBP) per Full Program
  • 20:6
  • The MSc is focused on advanced programming in C++ in a games production context, team work, and new technologies (procedural procession, multicore platforms, and artificial intelligence and physics and animation in games). It is directed and taught by experts in the games and entertainment industries: 3 faculty members are working part-time in the games or post-production (sfx) industries, 3 other faculty members are also active in research and development (in graphics, geometry, AI, audio and mobile platform), and we also host visiting tutors who are actively involved in these industries. The programme integrates state-of-the-art technologies in its lab and course work (such as games engine, kinect, cloud gaming and next gen. consoles).


    What you study

    This course has a core focus on C++ and OpenGL as used by the games industry. There is a focus on the basic computer science that is used in games as well as shaders, multi-core programming and OpenCL. We cover many of the subjects which are common in games industry job interviews. Part of the course is the construction of a game engine as a group project. We also cover scripting with Lua, mobile devices such as Android and iOS and the mechanics of game construction. There is an emphasis on writing cross-platform games.

     Other topics we cover include:

    (i) Maths and graphics: review of mathematics needed for the development of modern games, special effects, and entertainment systems.

    (ii) business and practice: solid understanding of the industries of computer games and interactive entertainment, and highlighting the main management methods used in practice.

    (iii) AI: Path finding, steering behaviours, scripting and agent-based AI.

    (iv) Animation: Use of Motion capture, animation graphs and blending.

    (v) Physics: Using collision, constraints and rigging with common physics engines.

    You undertake a final research project towards your dissertation which is based on the skills, knowledge and programming techniques developed in the taught modules. The alternative is to do an internship in a games or sfx studio, preferably in the greater London area (available via our numerous industry contacts).


    Further information:

    Please see more detailed information about this course.

     


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