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Old 03-01-2009, 08:01 PM   #1
CANJ
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Default Good, but not good enough?

Hi,
Im currently a Game Design student in University on my Final year to get my Bachelor.
And my question is: am I good enough?

My two first years I did what I was told and did my home work, and have not had any problems, and not close to failing one year. But now I'm close to the end of my degree and find myself thinking that Im not close too good enough for the real world.

I look at my current skills as a environment modeller or a character modeller, and compare it to other games, and not close too there skills. I have from the start thought that the school will prepare me for the "real world", and if I graduate Im as good as I can become after my three years of study.

Is it close to standard that after your finished with your degree that you have to do home work to catch up with the companies?

How does the system work inside a game company?
If I get hired will they give me a task and I have to do it like all the others?
Do I get some "the new guy gradute" time in the company?
Is there some place to find what the level the companies expect from a first timer?

Everyweek we see different final year student work, but I feel like my work, it is not good enough for the real world even if it is good enough to get a passing grade.


-----------------

Also something I want to add and want others opinion on.
Here is my last year, we have 5 projects, one counts 40% of this year, and is the most important project. But in this project we have to write a report on 10,000 words MINIMUM, also the report counts 70% of the projects grade? is not this just STUPID???

This project lasts 7 month, and I have to turn in it in next month.
7 month / 30% is 2,1 month.
That means that I sould do 2 month with 3D, and 5month writing a raport, does that make sense to all you others?
Also Im paying close to $18,000 for only this year, want to guess how many lectures we have pr.week?
no you guessed wrong, we have 1-3 hours with lecture pr.week, yes thank you.

(sorry raged, but needed to get it out)
Thanks

Last edited by CANJ : 03-01-2009 at 10:11 PM.
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Old 03-01-2009, 10:22 PM   #2
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Wasup canj, i certainly feel the same more or less in regards to what i level of progress shows on my portfolio. I guess the best thing to do if you feel that your work isn't up to par with those real world works of art is to just keep honing your skills in what ever you plan on working as. I don't know what the deal with that work load you have in that school but it does seem a bit much and some what out of whack.
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Old 03-02-2009, 01:29 AM   #3
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To be honest, I think that a degree from any university is to get you comfortable with the tools, getting used to motivating yourself to work hard (hence the 7 month project by yourself) and .

If you feel that your work isn't up to the standards that the industry is showing, continue to improve it in your own time.

But as far as I know, if you're lucky to get a junior position in a games company, they won't expect you to produce fabulous art from day one (especially not above the standard of your portfolio). There's always a learning period in new jobs, but don't waste this time. As I said before, hone your skills and continue to improve your work.

Everyone believes that after they leave their uni course after 3/4 years they'll have all the skills they need to start applying for jobs, sadly, this is not the case most of the time.
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Old 03-02-2009, 06:41 AM   #4
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In general, degrees only enable a short period of intellectual exploration and prepare you for further learning. They don't hand you the skills you need and won't force you to produce work to the a certain level.

If you feel you arn't good enough, then work on improving. If you arn't improving fast enough, then you should take a look at yourself and the steps you are taking, then decide whether you need to make adjustments or just be more patient.

Hope this helps :-)
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Old 03-02-2009, 06:43 AM   #5
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Quote:
And my question is: am I good enough?
Generally, if you have to ask, probably not. Also, without showing us any of your work, impossible to answer.

Quote:
I have from the start thought that the school will prepare me for the "real world", and if I graduate Im as good as I can become after my three years of study.
I thought exactly the same and found out the hard way that it wasn't.

Quote:
Is it close to standard that after your finished with your degree that you have to do home work to catch up with the companies?
No. You shouldn't stop learning after your degree which is a common mistake that a lot of graduates make and you should have been doing projects and/or learning beyond the University studies during University.

Quote:
How does the system work inside a game company?
Which system?

Quote:
If I get hired will they give me a task and I have to do it like all the others?
Yes, what did you expect?

Quote:
Do I get some "the new guy gradute" time in the company?
You will get 'new employee' time to get used to their workflow, tools and team. The fact that you are a graduate just means you get graduate level tasks. Also note that there will be a probation period for new hires where if they are not up to the task, they can be fired without notice.

Quote:
Is there some place to find what the level the companies expect from a first timer?
Not really as each company is likely to want something different from a new hire. You can probably find some industry related tests and look at the job descriptions to get a rough idea of what is expected.

Quote:
Everyweek we see different final year student work, but I feel like my work, it is not good enough for the real world even if it is good enough to get a passing grade.
If you know this then you should also know what the solution is.

Quote:
Here is my last year, we have 5 projects, one counts 40% of this year, and is the most important project. But in this project we have to write a report on 10,000 words MINIMUM, also the report counts 70% of the projects grade? is not this just STUPID???
Stupid? No. Unfair? Probably. This is the same for all courses at Universities, not just yours. The report is about what you learned from the project itself rather then how good the end result was and that is where the emphasis is for a Final Year project.

Quote:
This project lasts 7 month, and I have to turn in it in next month.
7 month / 30% is 2,1 month.
That means that I sould do 2 month with 3D, and 5month writing a raport, does that make sense to all you others?
From a time spent to mark ratio, yes. From a practical point of view, not really. You can easily spend more time on the project then the report and still get the same mark and to be honest, as long as you planned and documented properly, it doesn't take that long to do. For my BSc, I spent 5 mths on the project and then the last 2 on report. For my MSc, I wrote the report as I went along after every major milestone.

Quote:
Also Im paying close to $18,000 for only this year, want to guess how many lectures we have pr.week?
no you guessed wrong, we have 1-3 hours with lecture pr.week, yes thank you.
What about supervised practical sessions? Use and access of on-site equipment? Access to staff for problems/projects/discussions?
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Old 03-02-2009, 09:29 AM   #6
twenty1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yaustar View Post
Generally, if you have to ask, probably not. Also, without showing us any of your work, impossible to answer.


I thought exactly the same and found out the hard way that it wasn't.


No. You shouldn't stop learning after your degree which is a common mistake that a lot of graduates make and you should have been doing projects and/or learning beyond the University studies during University.


Which system?


Yes, what did you expect?


You will get 'new employee' time to get used to their workflow, tools and team. The fact that you are a graduate just means you get graduate level tasks. Also note that there will be a probation period for new hires where if they are not up to the task, they can be fired without notice.


Not really as each company is likely to want something different from a new hire. You can probably find some industry related tests and look at the job descriptions to get a rough idea of what is expected.


If you know this then you should also know what the solution is.


Stupid? No. Unfair? Probably. This is the same for all courses at Universities, not just yours. The report is about what you learned from the project itself rather then how good the end result was and that is where the emphasis is for a Final Year project.


From a time spent to mark ratio, yes. From a practical point of view, not really. You can easily spend more time on the project then the report and still get the same mark and to be honest, as long as you planned and documented properly, it doesn't take that long to do. For my BSc, I spent 5 mths on the project and then the last 2 on report. For my MSc, I wrote the report as I went along after every major milestone.


What about supervised practical sessions? Use and access of on-site equipment? Access to staff for problems/projects/discussions?




this is a nice REAL WORLD look on things couldnt have broke down the original posters inquiry better myself
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Old 03-03-2009, 06:33 AM   #7
Zooch
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These colleges should include a mandatory class mid-way through the degree program that better prepares people for real life (both in and out of this industry). I personally wouldn't ever hire someone that's just graduated from college with no work experience and no real direction as to how or what they're supposed to do.

It's good that you're taking initiative in asking though. Keep reading more and more about this industry and post your questions. You still have a lot to learn that your uni probably won't teach you.
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