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Old 08-25-2008, 11:03 PM   #21
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Couldn't you simply boot into DOS?
AFAIK you need something to slow down your computer, and downgrade the graphics/sound cards, normal DOS can't handle that
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Old 08-26-2008, 09:13 AM   #22
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I agree with TG.

I pretty much stopped having any form of success with these once Windows 2000 came along (or thereabout).

As a secondary thought, another advantage to being an 'elder gamer' is that we know how to operate in DOS mode!
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Old 08-26-2008, 09:43 AM   #23
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As a secondary thought, another advantage to being an 'elder gamer' is that we know how to operate in DOS mode!
Haha yes. Helps with moving around console.
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Old 08-28-2008, 11:18 AM   #24
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Here's an interesting progression to this topic:

How do you, as elder gamers, integrate your children, if you have any, into the gaming lifestyle?

How do you go about teaching them healthy computer habits as well? The challenges facing kids these days are much greater then they were for us.

I don't have kids, so I don't have much I can add here.

But I may make use of your suggestions someday!
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Old 08-28-2008, 02:07 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Kodiak View Post
How do you, as elder gamers, integrate your children, if you have any, into the gaming lifestyle?

How do you go about teaching them healthy computer habits as well? The challenges facing kids these days are much greater then they were for us.

I don't have kids, so I don't have much I can add here.
I don't have children, but I do have a companion who I'm moulding into someone who can share my passion for games and computers and stuff. Does that count? Although, internet courtesy evades many adults as well as children...so it isn't just kids that need shaping up a lot of the time...
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Old 08-28-2008, 10:15 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kodiak View Post
Here's an interesting progression to this topic:

How do you, as elder gamers, integrate your children, if you have any, into the gaming lifestyle?

How do you go about teaching them healthy computer habits as well? The challenges facing kids these days are much greater then they were for us.

I don't have kids, so I don't have much I can add here.

But I may make use of your suggestions someday!
Well, I don't have any children either, but I do have a 5 year old neice that is starting to show gaming tendencies, which on one hand is quite nice but on the other it's a bit disturbing that when we are having a family dinner she prefers to sit by the computer by herself and play games. I really think that the main point at this age is to limit the play time on the computer, I really think that children should develop real world communicaiton skills and play outside before they emerse themselves into virtual worlds.
I also think that computer games can be used to that end in the form of group games, a thing that for example the Wii is excellent for, how many articles have we read so far about families that play games together on that platform?
In general, I think the way to teach healthy game habits is by guidance - don't let the kid play by himslef, play games together (the same as you would play games in the yard), and for single player games - sit with them while they are playing (when possible), know what games they love to play and discuss these games with them. If the child encounters an inappropriate game for his age, I think the best way is to discuss why this game is problematic instaed of just forbidding playing with it.
I think the main difference between now and when we were children, is that back then games were preceived as a harmless child game (sadly, my parents still preveive them as such) and today we know that games are much more then that.
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Old 08-28-2008, 10:38 PM   #27
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Well, I don't have any children either, but I do have a 5 year old neice that is starting to show gaming tendencies, which on one hand is quite nice but on the other it's a bit disturbing that when we are having a family dinner she prefers to sit by the computer by herself and play games. I really think that the main point at this age is to limit the play time on the computer, I really think that children should develop real world communicaiton skills and play outside before they emerse themselves into virtual worlds.
Ah, I actually have a cousin who was like that. He refuses to eat at the table on most occasions and spends a lot of time playing computer games. However, I think a lot of that is more to do with the fact that he has been spoilt a lot because his parents (my aunt and uncle) are mega rich.

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In general, I think the way to teach healthy game habits is by guidance - don't let the kid play by himslef, play games together (the same as you would play games in the yard), and for single player games - sit with them while they are playing (when possible), know what games they love to play and discuss these games with them.
Get a Wii!

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If the child encounters an inappropriate game for his age, I think the best way is to discuss why this game is problematic instaed of just forbidding playing with it.
Yup. Although it's easier said then done, especially when their friends have parents that are less aware of censorship law.

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I think the main difference between now and when we were children, is that back then games were preceived as a harmless child game (sadly, my parents still preveive them as such) and today we know that games are much more then that.
I'm not sure where you're going with this. Yeah, I would agree that if you sit your six year old kid in front of the latest 18+ certified FPS release (or equivilent censored game) then it proberbly isn't a good idea. However, I feel there is quite a lot of education and emotion in games today; especially those that are aimed at children.

The main problem would be helping the child develop self control and the parents exercising some restraint when purchasing and playing games. Most of the boys in my family are games fanatics, but it is only the rich kid that plays them obsessively.
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Old 08-29-2008, 12:27 AM   #28
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Get a Wii!
Actually gave my Wii to my brother yesterday (as a loan, of course), I have too many consoles and not enough time...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrir
I'm not sure where you're going with this. Yeah, I would agree that if you sit your six year old kid in front of the latest 18+ certified FPS release (or equivilent censored game) then it proberbly isn't a good idea. However, I feel there is quite a lot of education and emotion in games today; especially those that are aimed at children.
It feels like games today have alot more content then they used to have. not to speak of the online games, where children can meet all sorts of people from all over the world - which in general I think is has a great potential, but has its dangers as well.

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The main problem would be helping the child develop self control and the parents exercising some restraint when purchasing and playing games. Most of the boys in my family are games fanatics, but it is only the rich kid that plays them obsessively.
As much as I love games, I would still like to see children reading books and playing outside or with toys like Lego and Playmobile (although having a virtual Lego system could be cheaper and more accesible to children that can't afford real Lego sets). I think a child should be able to create his/hers own imaginery world and not just interact in an already existing one.
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Old 08-29-2008, 04:48 AM   #29
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As much as I love games, I would still like to see children reading books and playing outside or with toys like Lego and Playmobile (although having a virtual Lego system could be cheaper and more accesible to children that can't afford real Lego sets). I think a child should be able to create his/hers own imaginery world and not just interact in an already existing one.
I completely agree. I think a good idea is to give kids an amount of time they can play a day, say two hours. They can play this two hours however they want be it in one sitting or spaced out. Then make them do something else like what you said. This is how my parents did it and it worked out pretty well for me, I mean I love sports and legos and just reading so I guess it worked.
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Old 08-29-2008, 07:55 AM   #30
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I agree too. I grew up with a '1 hour of screen time' rule, and it was a good system. Especially considering that today, you can save your game, and you don't have to start over every time :P
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