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Old 02-27-2009, 07:32 PM   #1
nef
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Default C vs. C++

I've learned to not put:

C/C++

on a resume unless you are ready to answer questions related to each. In school I was taught to make my resume this way, but after some real C experience I realized that the languages are different enough that someone who knows C++ will NOT necessarily know how to perform the operation in C.

To me, the languages are so different that it's a lie to put C/C++ on a resume unless you can perform any problem in both languages.

What do you guys think about tying the two languages together like this?

I've been asked to solve problems in strict C code that could have been finished way faster/easier if i was allowed use of C++ objects.
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Old 02-27-2009, 10:04 PM   #2
dzeligman
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I agree that they should be separated. Most of my higher level CS courses have required using lower-level C. The requirement of using C based arrays and functions vs something like std::vector really changes things.

On my resume I separate my languages into three categories :
Highly skilled
Skilled
Experienced with

Some people put years of experience, but I prefer the more abstract because someone can using a language every day for 6 months could know it better than someone using it on and off every 6 years.
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Old 02-28-2009, 05:34 AM   #3
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Definitely should be separated. After being caught out a few times using old C code, I had to go back a re-read some of my books on C.
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Old 02-28-2009, 08:29 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dzeligman View Post
On my resume I separate my languages into three categories :
Highly skilled
Skilled
Experienced with
I like this, I think I'll change my resume to have this.
I know on my old resume I had C/C++ but I have realized I don't quite have the knowledge I thought I did of the language so I'll probably just put it in an experienced with section.
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Old 02-28-2009, 11:30 AM   #5
DTR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yaustar View Post
Definitely should be separated. After being caught out a few times using old C code, I had to go back a re-read some of my books on C.
What exactly qualifies as "old" C - code?

For reasons unknown, my local university has chosen to adhere the ANSI C aka C89 standard.

Everyone, including the lecturers whine how old it is, but still its followed to the letter.
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Old 02-28-2009, 03:28 PM   #6
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When I said old, I meant it in the context that the code itself was old rather then the standard that it was written in. Some of the annoyances come from forgetting to declare all variables at the top of the function and the difference between FunctionName(void) and FunctionName().
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